SASSAFRAGMENT

Apr 05

[video]

[video]

fuckyeahrachelmaddow:

“Rachel Maddow - Mannish but friendly.”
From the 3/31/04 launch of Air America Radio, via Catherine Sardina

fuckyeahrachelmaddow:

“Rachel Maddow - Mannish but friendly.”

From the 3/31/04 launch of Air America Radio, via Catherine Sardina

(via the-unfeminine-female)

[video]

[video]

Mar 17

theatlantic:

Finnish Education Chief: ‘We Created a School System Based on Equality’

Finnish education often seems paradoxical to outside observers because it appears to break a lot of the rules we take for granted. Finnish children don’t begin school until age 7. They have more recess, shorter school hours than many U.S. children do (nearly 300 fewer hours per year in elementary school), and the lightest homework load of any industrialized nation. There are no gifted programs, almost no private schools, and no high-stakes national standardized tests.
Yet over the past decade Finland has consistently performed among the top nations on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a standardized test given to 15-year olds in 65 nations and territories around the world. Finland’s school children didn’t always excel. Finland built its excellent, efficient, and equitable educational system in a few decades from scratch, and the concept guiding almost every educational reform has been equity.  The Finnish paradox is that by focusing on the bigger picture for all, Finland has succeeded at fostering the individual potential of most every child.
I recently accompanied Krista Kiuru, Finland’s minister of education and science, when she visited the Eliot K-8 Innovation School in Boston, and asked her what Finland is doing that we could learn from.
Read more.[Image: hydropeek/flickr]


"Academics isn’t all kids need. Kids need so much more. School should be where we teach the meaning of life; where kids learn they are needed; where they can learn community skills. We like to think that school is also important for developing a good self-image, a strong sensitivity to other people’s feelings … and understanding it matters to take care of others. We definitely want to incorporate all those things in education.”

theatlantic:

Finnish Education Chief: ‘We Created a School System Based on Equality’

Finnish education often seems paradoxical to outside observers because it appears to break a lot of the rules we take for granted. Finnish children don’t begin school until age 7. They have more recess, shorter school hours than many U.S. children do (nearly 300 fewer hours per year in elementary school), and the lightest homework load of any industrialized nation. There are no gifted programs, almost no private schools, and no high-stakes national standardized tests.

Yet over the past decade Finland has consistently performed among the top nations on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a standardized test given to 15-year olds in 65 nations and territories around the world. Finland’s school children didn’t always excel. Finland built its excellent, efficient, and equitable educational system in a few decades from scratch, and the concept guiding almost every educational reform has been equity.  The Finnish paradox is that by focusing on the bigger picture for all, Finland has succeeded at fostering the individual potential of most every child.

I recently accompanied Krista Kiuru, Finland’s minister of education and science, when she visited the Eliot K-8 Innovation School in Boston, and asked her what Finland is doing that we could learn from.

Read more.[Image: hydropeek/flickr]

"Academics isn’t all kids need. Kids need so much more. School should be where we teach the meaning of life; where kids learn they are needed; where they can learn community skills. We like to think that school is also important for developing a good self-image, a strong sensitivity to other people’s feelings … and understanding it matters to take care of others. We definitely want to incorporate all those things in education.”

“Great people do things before they’re ready. They do things before they know they can do it. And by doing it, they’re proven right. Because, I think there’s something inside of you—and inside of all of us—when we see something and we think, “I think I can do it, I think I can do it. But I’m afraid to.” Bridging that gap, doing what you’re afraid of, getting out of your comfort zone, taking risks like that—THAT is what life is. And I think you might be really good. You might find out something about yourself that’s special. And if you’re not good, who cares? You tried something. Now you know something about yourself. Now you know. A mystery is solved. So, I think you should just give it a try. Just inch yourself out of that back line. Step into life. Courage. Risks. Yes. Go. Now.” — Amy Poehler  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: tinytruant, via thatkindofwoman)

[video]

Mar 10

[video]

Mar 05

dannielle:

specialbored:

Tordaze Sporkels….

god, I miss Vinnie’s so much.

dannielle:

specialbored:

Tordaze Sporkels….

god, I miss Vinnie’s so much.

pleatedjeans:

via

pleatedjeans:

via

(Source: gemmacorrell, via idontfkingcareifyoulikeit)

Everything Hurts All The Time -

gaoku:

This article just ravaged my heartstrings. I relate to this on a whole other level. Take some time to read it..

(via autostraddle)

dannielle:

liftedandgiftedd:

that spoon twirl was so gangster

that is what’s up tho

dannielle:

liftedandgiftedd:

that spoon twirl was so gangster

that is what’s up tho

(Source: ruinedchildhood)

valscrapbook:

(via sur1rdebrocante, wolf-eel)

valscrapbook:

(via sur1rdebrocante, wolf-eel)